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Category: Science

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Niki Brigs Battles for the Belt – And Wins

In just under a year since she began her journey as a bodybuilder, Niki Brigs earned her title as a professional at the Organization of Competitive Bodybuilders’ Battle of the Belt in Aug.

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Overcoming First Day Jitters

School’s back in session, rapidly reversing summer’s recession of classroom blues.

Whether you’re the new kid or a seasoned pupil amongst the hustle and bustle of peers hurrying through the hallways during the first week, you’re not alone in your first day jitters. 50.8 million students will be at the hands of 3.2 million teachers in public schools across America, the National Center for Education Statistics reports.

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How Going Back to School is Pretty Cool

Education is a facet of modern living, an enriching experience we often take for granted in 2019 – and there are a lot of reasons why. While the slight majority feels engaged in school, only 48 percent of secondary school students feel what they are learning will benefit them in the real world, according to Youth Truth student survey issued in 2017.

Other factors that contribute to student dissatisfaction come into play, as well: inadequate academic environments, the competitive attitude towards grades, peer pressure, and the meer fact that school starts so early in the morning.

However, the negative attitude towards school as a whole only perpetuates feelings of dread, anxiety, and indifference towards course materials, when there’s a lot that could be celebrated, instead.

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Review: Neurologic by Dr. Eliezer J. Sternberg

Have you ever wondered what someone might dream of if they were blind? Would they see anything? How about zombies? Could they drive to work? Can we remember things that never actually happened?

All of these questions, and much, much more are thoroughly answered and explored in Dr. Eliezer J. Sternberg’s, “Neurologic: The Brain’s Hidden Rationale Behind Our Irrational Behavior.”

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Water in Kilauea: The Impact and Potential Aftermath

Water was found in Kilauea, the most active volcano on the island of Hawai’i, on July 25, according to US Geological Survey (USGS)’s most recent report.

Recently, we reached out to Janet Babb and Dr. Carolyn Parcheta, experts with the USGS, via email to learn more about these findings and what they could mean for Kilauea, the island of Hawaii, and its residents.

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Joining the Battle Against Spotted Lanternflies

The Spotted Lanternfly is a destructive pest with the potential to cost Pa’s economy in the upwards of $18 billion dollars, the Penn State Extension (PSE) reports. Since their discovery in Berks County five years ago, they’ve rapidly invaded southeastern Pa.

In an effort to engage residents in the Pa Department of Agriculture (PDA)’s fight against this insect, the PDA will offer permits for 31 in-person Spotted Lanternfly classes for businesses across 14 counties, including: Lehigh, Berks, Lancaster, Chester, Delaware, Philadelphia, Montgomery, and Bucks.

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What’s Beneath Greenland May Not Be so Green

Greenland is a vast island adorned in an ice sheet that’s three times the size of Texas, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC).

Although Greenland’s ice sheet has withstood the test of time over the last 2.7 million years, its increase in surface melt over the last few years is rapidly chipping away at the island’s 656,000 square mile blanket of ice.

What lies beneath the ice, and what lies in our future if these trends continue, is a future that is far from green (for us, at least).

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